Una Stubbs: Till Death Us Do Part and Sherlock actress dies aged 84

Actress Una Stubbs, known for her roles in TV shows like Worzel Gummidge, Till Death Us Do Part, Sherlock, and EastEnders, has died at the age of 84.

Stubbs found fame in the 1960s, appearing in films like Sir Cliff Richard’s Summer Holiday, and remained one of the UK’s best-loved screen stars.

Her agent said she died at her home in Edinburgh surrounded by her family.

The veteran actress had been ill for a few months, the agent told BBC News.

After starting her career as a dancer, Stubbs became a fixture on the small screen in the 60s when she played Alf Garnett’s exasperated daughter Rita in Till Death Us Do Part and the 1980s follow-ups ‘Til Death and In Sickness and In Health.

Anthony Booth, Una Stubbs, Warren Mitchell and Dandy Nichols in Till Death Us Do Part

She was also a regular on the game show Don’t Say A Word and its follow-up Give us a Clue, and became a favourite of young audiences as Aunt Sally in Worzel Gummidge.

She starred in another children’s hit, The Worst Witch, in the late 1990s, as well as appearing in soap EastEnders, The Catherine Tate Show and sitcom Benidorm.

Her last major role saw her play Sherlock’s landlady Mrs Hudson in the BBC drama starring Benedict Cumberbatch.

Stubbs (right) pictured in a 2006 episode of EastEnders with Emma Barton and Barbara Windsor

In a statement, her sons Joe and Christian Henson and Jason Gilmore said: “Mum passed away quietly today with her family around her, in Edinburgh. We ask for privacy and understanding at this most difficult and sad of times.”

Her agent Rebecca Blond, who represented Stubbs for more than 20 years, said she would “miss her enormously and remember her always”.

She said: “We are desperately sad to have lost not only a wonderful actress, whose screen and stage career, spanning over 50 years, was so extraordinarily varied, from Till Death Us Do Part to Sherlock, as well as memorable performances in the West End, at the Old Vic, Donmar Warehouse, Sheffield Crucible and National Theatre, but also a wickedly funny, elegant, stylish, graceful, gracious and kind and constant friend.

“She was also a highly respected and exhibited artist.”

Broadcaster Gyles Brandreth said: “Oh, this is so sad. Such a funny, lovely, gifted lady – a marvellous actress with a special style & a great (and impish) sense of humour. I first met her when she was in Cowardy Custard in 1972 & last saw her at Nicky Henson’s funeral last year. A sad day.”

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