NPP will not legalise okada – Bawumia

Motorcycle accident

Vice President, Dr Mahamudu Bawumia, has stated that the government will not legalise the use of motorcycles for carrying fare-paying passengers popularly known as okada.

Rather, Dr Bawumia said that the riders “need to graduate from this risky Okada riding to a safer means of transportation.”

To that end, he said the government would not legalise the practise but provide an alternative for okada riders and would maintain the status quo of a ban.

Dr Bawumia made the comments at a programme where German carmaker VW signed an MoU with BlackIvy to produce homes and cars for Ghanaians.

So riders would be supported with credit as part of government’s automobile development drive to switch to commercial vehicles to earn a living.

In recent times, the debate on okada has been heightened following a promise of legalisation by the opposition candidate, former President Mahama contesting again on the ticket of the National Democratic Congress (NDC) and under whose leadership, it passed the law to out-law Okada business in the election year of 2012.

This prompted a response in which the Transport Minister, Kwasi Ofori Asiamah,  said that a stakeholder consultation was ongoing. However, it was halted due to the COVID-19 and would resume before the end of 2020.

READ ALSO: SPECIAL REPORT: The Okada Angels Of Death- The Big Debate (Part 1)

The prohibition of motorcycles for commercial vehicles was informed by safety and security, and it is grounded in law as captured by Road Traffic Regulations, 2012 (Legislative Instrument 2180).

Section 128 (1) of L.l. 2180 states–– “The licensing authority shall not register a motorcycle to carry a fare-paying passenger.”

READ ALSO: SPECIAL REPORT: The Day Two Rival MPs Agreed On Legalization -The Big Okada Debate (Final Pt)

Section 128 (2) states –– “A person shall not permit a motorcycle or tricycle which that person exercises control to be used for commercial purposes except for courier and delivery services.”

READ ALSO: No Ambulance: ‘Okada’ To The Rescue Of ‘Dying’ Woman

Section 128 (3) states –– “A person shall not ride on a motorcycle or tricycle as a paying passenger.”

The development has split heads as critics such as think tank, IMANI Africa, supports legalization due to the economic benefits.

READ ALSO: SPECIAL REPORT: The Okada Queen Of Accra-The Big Okada Debate (Part 2)

MPs have also had varied opinions with the House split over a review of the legislation.

The riders, who claim to have a membership of 800,000, have thrown their support behind Mr Mahama.

They also insist that they no problem with training and a licencing regime to check safety.

3 Comments
  1. Anonymous says

    The law says a person shall not ride a motorcycle as a fee paying passenger. It means a rider can pick a second person but should not collect money from that person. Whether money is collected from the person you pick on a motorcycle or not what difference does it make in terms of causes of road accident..

  2. Anonymous says

    Some form of flexibility is needed to resolve this impasse.

    Rwanda has a lesson to offer in this respect.
    Mr. Kusi Boadi can confirm that in Rwanda Okada is regularised and incorporated in the public transportation system.
    Riders are registered for specific routes and are obliged to wear helmets. In addition they have to carry a clean spare helmet for the passengers

  3. Soradji Abdul Rauf says

    So if only the law say they should stop the motto cycle work purpularly known as OKADA, then it means all the motto cycle selling should also be ceased to stop the buying and spreading of the motto or else when someone picks someone on his or her motto cycle how will the police know the cycle is gonna take fare or not?? Or does it mean PRIVIT MOTTOS DOESN’T MAKE ACCIDENT?? THE ONLY ADVISE IS TO TELL THE RIDDERS TO RIDE CAREFULLY.

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